Ideation Workshops in Alaska & Hawaii

In January, two-day Ideation Workshops were held in Alaska and Hawaii, drawing on Microsoft’s Inclusive Design methodology. The goal of the workshops was to engage local community members and project stakeholders in generating ideas and insights about the real-life experience of people seeking legal help to inform the user experience design of the Legal Access Platform.

“The Inclusive Design principle is a broad-spectrum idea meant to produce products that are inherently accessible to all, people with disabilities and people without.  Microsoft believes strongly that this human-centric design results in products that benefit people universally. As such, it has been mandated as a key tenant for all product development across the company.” Carly Ichiki, Lead Project Manager for the Initiative, Microsoft

The Ideation workshops incorporated findings from user immersion studies conducted in the fall 2017 in Alaska and Hawaii. Using a toolkit developed by Microsoft, local community engagement firms in each state conducted surveys and interviews of individuals who had experienced legal needs themselves or knew people who had. The user immersion studies helped us gain a more personalized understanding of the problem space, the people we are trying to help, and the challenges they face in learning about and navigating the legal system.

Ideation Workshop Hawaii PhotosParticipants in the Ideation Workshops included local community members who had either experienced legal needs themselves, or who are frequently sought out as “navigators” for others in their community seeking legal help. Additional participants included members of the national project team, and representatives from the Alaska Court System and Justice for All project, Alaska Legal Services Corporation, United Way / 211, the Alaska public library system and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, among other groups. Organizational participants in Hawaii included the Legal Aid Society of Hawaii, Family Court on Oahu and Aloha United Way / 211.

Ideation Workshop Alaska PhotosThe first day of each workshop drew on personal stories shared by these individuals to prioritize key user needs and wants in the Legal Access Platform. During the second day, designers from Fell Swoop, a user experience design firm, assisted small groups in storyboarding examples of how people might access the Platform and engage with resources available on it to find solutions to their legal problems.

The Microsoft and Fell Swoop teams now have the exciting – and daunting! – task of synthesizing the rich and varied feedback from these workshops into a design brief, and ultimately, prototype designs that will be user-tested in Anchorage and Honolulu in the next month.

Incubating Innovation along the Pacific Rim – Part l: Alaska

Planning work is well underway with our justice community partners in Alaska and Hawaii, but why were these states chosen for this pilot? For a variety of reasons, both jurisdictions are ideally suited as laboratories for new, technology-enabled approaches to significantly expanded access to civil legal resources and solutions.

Alaska superimposed on lower 48Did you know that if superimposed on the lower 48 states, Alaska would stretch from San Francisco, CA to Jacksonville, FL? The municipality of Anchorage is about the size of Delaware alone, and many of the smaller towns and Native Alaskan villages have less than 250-300 residents with no direct road system to connect them. Very few rural communities have lawyers or courts, and some communities in urban centers such as Anchorage and Fairbanks face high unemployment and poverty.

Alaska is also one of the most linguistically diverse states in the country. The Anchorage School District has students who speak more than 107 languages other than English, and Alaska has at least twenty distinct Native languages.

These natural challenges of geography, limited infrastructure and language diversity make traditional means of delivering legal services more difficult.  Because of these factors, the Alaska justice community has found unique ways to surmount these barriers:

    • Alaska has a strong, community-focused network of resource providers across legal aid groups, domestic violence advocates, public libraries, elder advocacy programs, Alaska Native law institutions, among others, that has been born of the need to address gaps in coverage and direct access to legal assistance. This emphasis on community collaboration is modelling offline many of the same strategies the Portal initial aims to undertake online.
    • The Alaska Court System is leading other states in its use of technology to enable remote court appearances via video or by telephone in court proceedings by parties, lawyers, interpreters, and sometimes the judge, which is a common practice today. Every court room has its own toll free conference line to enable telephonic appearances by participating individuals. Similarly, Alaska Legal Services Corporation is a leader in developing innovative medical legal-partnerships and multimedia legal rights resources that significantly expand the reach of legal information and assistance into rural and Native Alaskan communities.
    • Alaska is a long-time leader in developing e-medicine and community health aid programs to overcome challenges in health care delivery, including the shortage of medical professionals in many local communities and distance to specialized experience. These models, as well as the telecom infrastructure developed to support them, can inspire and inform our work on the Portal initiative to bridge analogous challenges in the legal sector.

The Alaska justice community has a deep emphasis on collaboration and a demonstrated spirit of innovation when it comes to forging creative solutions to justice problems. These qualities, along with the well-established programs described above, provide a great environment for piloting the Portal concept. We are excited to be partnering with the Alaska Courts Access to Justice Commission.

 

Stay tuned for Incubating Innovation along the Pacific Rim – Part II: Hawaii